All the Rage: Mothers, Fathers, and the Myth of Equal Partnership

Title: All the Rage: Mothers, Fathers, and the Myth of Equal Partnership

Author: Darcy Lockman

Series: N/A

Publication Date: May 7th, 2019

Format: Audiobook

Genre: Non-Fiction

Sub Genre(s):  Relationships, Parenting, Feminism

Summary: The inequity of domestic life is one of the most profound and perplexing conundrums of our time. In an era of seemingly unprecedented feminist activism, enlightenment, and change, data show that one area of gender inequality stubbornly remains: the unequal amount of parental work that falls on women, no matter their class or professional status. All the Rage investigates the cause of this pervasive inequity to answer why, in households where both parents work full-time, mothers’ contributions—even those women who earn more than their partners—still outweigh fathers’ when it comes to raising children and maintaining a home.

How can this be? How, in a culture that has studied and lauded the benefits of fathers’ being active, present partners in child-rearing—benefits that extend far beyond the well-being of the kids themselves—can a commitment to fairness in marriage melt away upon the arrival of children?

Darcy Lockman drills deep to find answers, exploring how the feminist promise of true domestic partnership almost never, in fact, comes to pass. Starting with her own case-study as Ground Zero, she moves outward, chronicling the experiences of a diverse cross-section of women raising children with men; visiting new mothers’ groups and pioneering co-parenting specialists; and interviewing experts across academic fields, from gender studies professors and anthropologists to neuroscientists and primatologists. Lockman identifies three tenets that have upheld the cultural gender division of labor and peels back the reasons both men and women are culpable. Her findings are startling—and offer a catalyst for true change.


What I Liked: This book is written in an accessible way so it doesn’t read like a non-fiction book. You wouldn’t mistake it for fiction but I never found myself thinking I was reading a text book like some non-fiction books. I liked that Lockman approached this topic from personal experience and shared stories from her own life. It made this the topic more personal and I appreciated her openness. Two sections in particular stuck out to me: the studies done on how babies interact with each other and how quickly they start to pick up on our habits.  The other section that was interesting and enraging was how people still view women taking their husband’s last name when they get married. The personal anecdotes in this chapter are worth a read if only to see how dated some people’s views are and how strong the patriarchy is.

What I Didn’t Like:  If I had one minor complaint, it’s that the women she interviewed for the book started to blend together after a while because their stories were spread out over the entirety of the book instead of being told all at once. I couldn’t remember who was who by the end. This didn’t ruin anything for me but I found it a bit annoying. I also wish that Lockman had included steps people can take to influence change.

Who Should Read It: I honestly think everyone should read this book, even if you aren’t a parent or aren’t planning on having kids because a lot of the book focuses on communication between people in relationships and that’s something that everyone can relate to. However, if you’re a parent or thinking about having kids, I think this would be a great book to read.

Review Wrap Up: Sometimes the title of a book doesn’t match the contents of the story or the emotions you’ll feel while reading the book….that’s not the case with this book.  I felt ALL the rage while reading but it also made me think and want to recommend this book to everyone I know. This is an important book and I highly recommend it.

Favorite Quote:(s) “Sociologist Sharon Hayes writes that maternal behavior is ‘…neither a choice made by women nor a symbol of love and progress in society; rather, it is an indication of the power of men, whites, the upper classes, capitalists and state leaders to impose a particular form of family life on those less power than themselves.’”

“Research in Sweden has found that for female candidates, winning a race for government office doubles the baseline risk of subsequent divorce; campaigning and then losing does not. Whether a male candidate wins or loses an election has no direct bearing on his marital future. The same Swedish study found that married women who become CEOs are twice as likely to divorce within three years of this achievement than men who accomplish the same.”


thespinsterlibrarian

Delilah Green Doesn’t Care

Title: Delilah Green Doesn’t Care

Author: Ashley Herring Blake

Series: Bright Falls

Publication Date: February 22nd, 2022

Format:  e-book

Genre: Romance

Sub Genre(s): LGBTQ+, Contemporary


Summary: Delilah Green swore she would never go back to Bright Falls—nothing is there for her but memories of a lonely childhood where she was little more than a burden to her cold and distant stepfamily. Her life is in New York, with her photography career finally gaining steam and her bed never empty. Sure, it’s a different woman every night, but that’s just fine with her.

When Delilah’s estranged stepsister, Astrid, pressures her into photographing her wedding with a guilt trip and a five-figure check, Delilah finds herself back in the godforsaken town that she used to call home. She plans to breeze in and out, but then she sees Claire Sutherland, one of Astrid’s stuck-up besties, and decides that maybe there’s some fun (and a little retribution) to be had in Bright Falls, after all.

Having raised her eleven-year-old daughter mostly on her own while dealing with her unreliable ex and running a bookstore, Claire Sutherland depends upon a life without surprises. And Delilah Green is an unwelcome surprise…at first. Though they’ve known each other for years, they don’t really know each other—so Claire is unsettled when Delilah figures out exactly what buttons to push. When they’re forced together during a gauntlet of wedding preparations—including a plot to save Astrid from her horrible fiancé—Claire isn’t sure she has the strength to resist Delilah’s charms. Even worse, she’s starting to think she doesn’t want to…


What I Liked: Every character in this book is fully realized, with their own quirks and problems and feelings. Delilah can best be described as prickly but as we find out she has genuine reasons to be that way. It’s a testament to Herring Blake’s skill as a writer that Delilah never comes off as mean, at least to people who don’t deserve it. The queer representation in this book is something that has been missing in a lot of recent romance novels. Many LGBTQ romances seem to include queer characters as an afterthought but both Delilah and Claire feel like real people. Claire’s bisexuality is truly a part of her personality and shapes her thoughts and actions. I don’t know how Herring Blake did it, but she wrote a romance novel that is swoony and funny and heartwarming and also managed to write a touching story about the relationship between sisters and the importance of friends who always support you and the real struggles of co-parenting with an ex and the fear of being alone. Phew!  Every side story got enough time to feel important and I was invested in each and every character.

What I Didn’t Like: Ummm nothing? If pressed to find something to critique, the villains in the story sometimes felt a bit over the top and out of place in a book that overall felt authentic and real. However, the way they are dealt with in the end makes sense to the story.

Who Should Read It:  Any romance fan will find something to love about this book. I think this will end up being on a lot of best of the year lists.

Review Wrap Up: It was truly refreshing to read a romance in which the heroines are their authentic selves and love each other just as they are. The relationships in this book, both romantic and platonic, felt true and I want to be friends with this group in real life. It’s only January but this may end up being one of my favorite books of the year.  

Favorite Quote: “She didn’t have to be alone. Not unless she just wanted to be, and goddammit, she didn’t.”


thespinsterlibrarian

*Thank you to Berkley and Netgalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review*

Nature Poem

Title: Nature Poem

Author: Tommy Pico

Series: N/A

Publication Date: May 9th, 2017

Format:  Book

Genre: Poetry

Sub Genre(s):  Contemporary, LGBTQ+

Summary: Nature Poem follows Teebs—a young, queer, American Indian (or NDN) poet—who can’t bring himself to write a nature poem. For the reservation-born, urban-dwelling hipster, the exercise feels stereotypical, reductive, and boring. He hates nature. He prefers city lights to the night sky. He’d slap a tree across the face. He’d rather write a mountain of hashtag punchlines about death and give head in a pizza-parlor bathroom; he’d rather write odes to Aretha Franklin and Hole. While he’s adamant—bratty, even—about his distaste for the word “natural,” over the course of the book we see him confronting the assimilationist, historical, colonial-white ideas that collude NDN people with nature. The closer his people were identified with the “natural world,” he figures, the easier it was to mow them down like the underbrush. But Teebs gradually learns how to interpret constellations through his own lens, along with human nature, sexuality, language, music, and Twitter. Even while he reckons with manifest destiny and genocide and centuries of disenfranchisement, he learns how to have faith in his own voice.


What I Liked: This book felt like a book of poetry for people who say they don’t like poetry or don’t understand it. By using modern language and “text” speak like ‘yr’ and bc’ Pico makes it clear that this is a poem written for people living in the current time while still managing to pay tribute to his ancestors. His ability to move from humor to sadness to outrage in a single page is astounding and there were several times I found myself stopping to take in what I had just read.

What I Didn’t Like: I struggle with understanding poetry so my issue with this book is related to my own struggles with the content.  At times I couldn’t understand if the poem I was reading was separate from the long poem or if it was supposed to all be part of a single poem.  But this is a comment on my own lack of comprehension more than the book.

Who Should Read It: If you hear the word poetry and only think of dead white people, this would be a great book to pick up and see what young, modern poets are writing.

Review Wrap Up: This was my first time reading Pico’s poetry but it won’t be the last. I liked that he talked about serious issues like Indigenous rights and colonialism with more light-hearted things like music and where he’s eating that night. I don’t seek out poetry very often but I’m glad I picked this book up. I’d recommend this poem, especially for people who haven’t read a poem since they attended school.

Favorite Quote:  “How do statues become more galvanizing than refugees?”

“It seems foolish to discuss nature w/o talking about endemic poverty which seems foolish to discuss w/o talking about corporations given human agency which seems foolish to discuss w/o talking about colonialism which seems foolish to discuss w/o talking about misogyny”


thespinsterlibrarian

Count Your Lucky Stars

Title: Count Your Lucky Stars

Author: Alexandria Bellefleur

Series: Written in the Stars

Publication Date: February 1st, 2022

Format:  e-book

Genre: Romance

Sub Genre(s): LGBTQ+

Summary: Margot Cooper doesn’t do relationships. She tried and it blew up in her face, so she’ll stick with casual hookups, thank you very much. But now her entire crew has found “the one” and she’s beginning to feel like a fifth wheel. And then fate (the heartless bitch) intervenes. While touring a wedding venue with her engaged friends, Margot comes face-to-face with Olivia Grant—her childhood friend, her first love, her first… well, everything. It’s been ten years, but the moment they lock eyes, Margot’s cold, dead heart thumps in her chest.

Olivia must be hallucinating. In the decade since she last saw Margot, her life hasn’t gone exactly as planned. At almost thirty, she’s been married… and divorced. However, a wedding planner job in Seattle means a fresh start and a chance to follow her dreams. Never in a million years did she expect her important new client’s Best Woman would be the one that got away.

When a series of unfortunate events leaves Olivia without a place to stay, Margot offers up her spare room because she’s a Very Good Person. Obviously. It has nothing to do with the fact that Olivia is as beautiful as ever and the sparks between them still make Margot tingle. As they spend time in close quarters, Margot starts to question her no-strings stance. Olivia is everything she’s ever wanted, but Margot let her in once and it ended in disaster. Will history repeat itself or should she count her lucky stars that she gets a second chance with her first love? 


What I Liked:  After being a side character in the first two books of this series, Margot finally gets her own book. As one of my favorite characters in the previous stories, I couldn’t have been happier when I saw this book would be centered around her and her chance at love. I am usually not a fan of the childhood friends/first love trope because for some reason authors think that if a character found their “true love” when they were young that means they can never date anyone else or be happy for the rest of their lives until they are reunited once again. Here, Margot and Olivia have gone on to lead their own lives with its ups and downs and aren’t looking for each other when happenstance brings them together again. The reason for their initial falling out is believable so I was able to buy into their love story, even if the reason for their forced proximity togetherness is a bit wild (but hey, romance reasons!) I loved that all the characters from the previous books are in this one because the found family aspect of this series has been one of my favorite things about it.

What I Didn’t Like: Some of the conflict in this book could have been resolved if the characters just talked about what happened in the past so it was hard to not scream at the page sometimes “just say what you really feel!” But this is a romance novel so the angst has to come from somewhere and after being hurt in the past by each other, I can see why there would be some trepidation to open up. The other minor issue (and this isn’t really an issue, more an observation) is that I feel you must have read the first two books in the series to TRULY understand and enjoy this book as much as possible. It can certainly be read on its own but I would not recommend it.

Who Should Read It: Fans of second chance romances who like their stories with a medium level of heat. Fans of found family stories and romances with a touch of fate and magic sprinkled in.

Review Wrap Up: This was a great conclusion to the Written in the Stars series and may be my favorite one of them all. Margot is a fantastic, well-rounded character and Olivia was a great addition to the group. This is a series of friends that you want to be a part of, and I was sad to see them go. I would highly recommend you give this one a shot but make sure you start with the first book Written in the Stars.

Favorite Quote: “The right person shouldn’t complete you, they should love you the way you are. And it’s cool if they make you want to be better, but they should never make you feel like you’re too much or not enough exactly as you are.”


 

thespinsterlibrarian

D’Vaughn and Kris Plan a Wedding

Title: D’Vaughn and Kris Plan a Wedding

Author: Chencia C. Higgins

Series:  N/A

Publication Date:  January 25th, 2022 (expected)

Format:  E-book

Genre: Romance

Sub Genre(s): LGBTQ+

Summary: Instant I Do could be Kris Zavala’s big break. She’s right on the cusp of really making it as an influencer, so a stint on reality TV is the perfect chance to elevate her brand. And $100,000 wouldn’t hurt, either. D’Vaughn Miller is just trying to break out of her shell. She’s sort of neglected to come out to her mom for years, so a big splashy fake wedding is just the excuse she needs. All they have to do is convince their friends and family they’re getting married in six weeks. If anyone guesses they’re not for real, they’re out. Selling their chemistry on camera is surprisingly easy, and it’s still there when no one else is watching, which is an unexpected bonus. Winning this competition is going to be a piece of wedding cake.  But each week of the competition brings new challenges, and soon the prize money’s not the only thing at stake. A reality show isn’t the best place to create a solid foundation, and their fake wedding might just derail their relationship before it even starts.


What I Liked:  The representation in this book is incredible. The two leads are a fat, Black Lesbian and an Afro-Latina butch lesbian ,which would be amazing enough, but there are several queer side characters as well.  This was fun from page one and I thought the reality show premise was clever and made the insta-love trope more believable. I loved that the angst in this book didn’t come from the main relationship but rather the very real and difficult task of coming out to your family.

What I Didn’t Like: The relationship between Kris and D’Vaughn moved very quickly and while I know that’s the point of this book, I’m not a huge fan of insta-love stories so I would have loved a few more scenes of them falling in love. I would have also liked more closure between D’Vaughn and her mother about her coming out and the feelings surrounding that. This was a large part of the beginning of the book and I would have enjoyed a conversation between them to wrap things up.

Who Should Read It: If you like your romances to be fun and low-angst, this would be a great read for you. The steam level is pretty mild so this would be a good book for people who don’t want too much explicit sex in their romances.

Review Wrap Up: It took longer than I would have thought but reality TV-themed romance novels seem to be popping up more and more (see “One to Watch” and “If the Shoe Fits”). While I’m not a fan of reality shows, I have to admit they make a great backdrop for insta-love romances. While I felt this story wrapped up too quickly, I thought it was really fun and I was rooting for Kris and D’Vaughn the entire time and had a smile on my face at the end.

Favorite Quote: “…it was no secret that reality shows tended to put a certain style and shape of woman in front of the camera. Petite, with flawless skin. Dazzling smiles and relaxed hair. Skin so fair it was almost translucent. So aggressively heterosexual they were willing to fight another woman over a man offering community dick that was mediocre at best.”


thespinsterlibrarian

*Thank you to Carina Adores and Netgalley for providing an ARC in exchange for an honest review*

Electric Idol

Title: Electric Idol

Author: Katee Robert

Series: Dark Olympus

Publication Date: January 18th, 2022

Format: e-book

Genre: Romance

Sub Genre(s):  Fantasy


What I Liked:  The chemistry between Eros and Psyche was incredible and writing love scenes is clearly one of Roberts’ strong suits. The tension between them was amazing and one of the highlights of the story. The enemies to lovers and fake marriage tropes can be hard to pull off but the circumstances here work and the need to protect each other, from outside influences and themselves, was a really great way to show Psyche and Eros growing closer. I really love when heroes in romance novels feel like they don’t deserve the heroine so Eros was my dream romance lead. Only in romance novels can a damaged, flawed man be changed by love which is what I loved about this story. In real life, you will never change that man so don’t even try, haha! Psyche is how I wish all plus-sized heroines would be written. She is confident and sexy but also fully aware of the world she lives in, how she is viewed, and the limitations she has based on her size. She doesn’t let anyone talk down to her but knows how people judge her and it’s one of the most realistic portrayals of a plus-sized heroine I’ve read in a long time. One of my issues with Neon Gods was the lack of world-building so I liked learning more about the hierarchy of the leaders in Olympus and the insight into how the Thirteen are chosen.

What I Didn’t Like: Even though Roberts’ shares a little bit more about Olympus in this book, I feel like I still don’t know much about this world outside of its leaders so sometimes it felt like I was only getting part of the story. Who are the people these leaders are leading? Why are there Gods in the first place? I wish there was a more time taken to expand what we know about Olympus. For me, I don’t mind that this is not so much a retelling of Greek mythology as it is taking characters from the myths and writing about them, but I could see other readers being upset by that. Don’t expect this to be a classic retelling.

Who Should Read It: Fans of hot, fun, fake marriage romances that don’t mind a story that bends the definition of “modern retelling.’ You don’t need to have read the first book, Neon Gods, to enjoy this one but it would help as this one features characters that are in both books.

Review Wrap Up: Electric Idol was a fun read that highlighted Katee Roberts’ gift for writing steamy love scenes and builds upon the world she created in Neon Gods quite nicely. While there is nothing new here in terms of the tropes, I loved Eros and Psyche and I will continue reading this series.

Favorite Quote: “You might be a monster, Eros, but you’re my monster.”


thespinsterlibrarian

*Thank you to Sourcebooks Casablanca, Katee Robert, and Netgalley for providing an ARC in exchange for an honest review*

Homecoming King

This is the first book in Penny Reid’s brand-new series and while it has her trademark humor and charming characters, this feels like the beginning of something new and exciting for her “Pennyverse.” I’ve loved her other books and her writing has always been great, but I can see the growth of Reid’s writing in “Homecoming King” and I enjoyed every minute I spent in this new world.  I think every fan of contemporary romances will find something to love about this book.

I read a lot of and I’m a fast reader but it’s still rare for me to read a book in one day, let alone in one sitting, yet that’s what happened with this book. Once I started reading about Abigail and Rex, I didn’t want to stop. This was one of the most realistic fake marriage romances I’ve ever read, with this trope usually being so over the top that it’s hard to suspend my belief enough to enjoy the story.  Abby has sworn off dating after a particularly damaging relationship that left her in massive debt. She has also harbored a major crush on Rex since elementary school so her hesitance to agree to his fake marriage plan makes sense.  And Rex….oh my heart. Rex is the grumpy (but in fact super soft and lovable) romance hero of my dreams. His vulnerability is a rare trait not often seen in romance heroes and his willingness to wait for Abby to work through her own insecurities was wonderful.  In turn, Abby sees through his gruff exterior and sees who he really is, something that very few people in his life have taken the time to do.  This may be a slow burn story, but the chemistry between Abby and Rex practically leaps off the page the entire time.  Even their awkwardness with each other is charming, thanks to Reid’s usual quirky writing style.  

This being a Penny Reid book, the secondary characters in this book play a big part in the story.  Abby’s friend Kaylee was a friend we would all want to have in real life; she supports Abby while also giving her a kick in the butt when she needs it.  Cyrus ended up being the friend Rex needed the most, even though Rex didn’t know it and we could all use someone to have our backs like him.  Even the football wives, who are only in the book for a short time, managed to make an impression.  I can’t wait to read more about these characters in the next books in the series.

This was truly a wonderful and joyous book to read and a great start to a new series.  It uses the fake marriage trope to perfection and features relatable characters and a swoon-worthy romance. I highly recommend it for any romance fan, especially those looking for something fun to enjoy over the holidays.

Author: Penny Reid

Release Date: December 14th, 2021

Rating: 5 Stars

*Thank you to Cipher-Naught and Social Butterfly PR for the ARC in exchange for an honest review*

Eight Kisses: Eight All-New Tales of Holiday Romance

This was a fun anthology that truly has a story for every romance fan. In the foreword, the editor states that when looking for holiday romances, you can always find plenty of Christmas themed stories, but you have to search really hard to find stories that take place around Hanukkah.  This book was released in 2019 and while there has been an increase in Hanukkah romances, there is still a shocking lack of non-Christmas romance novels being published each year. If you are looking to change up your holiday reading, this book is a good place to begin.

To start, I think it was extremely clever to make this anthology eight stories in honor of the eight days of Hanukkah and to call this anthology Eight Kisses. Some of the authors take the eight theme even further and use the eight days of Hanukkah as a way to structure their story. The beauty of an anthology is that if you find yourself not liking a story, you can just skip it and not feel like you’re missing anything. Because each story is unique and there is a trope here for everyone, this is a great book for finding out which romance trope you really love and the ones that don’t do it for you. For the most part, I liked all the stories in this book and my issues with the ones I didn’t like had nothing to do with the author’s writing and more to do with my dislike of the plot and the short story structure. My favorite stories were A Highlander for Hanukkah, Can’t Help Falling, Frisky Connections, and Rededication. In my opinion, these had the most developed plots and involved Hanukkah the best. The other stories had undeveloped plots or too much going on, or there was not enough chemistry between the hero and heroine for me to get into the romance. I think this is where the short story format was a detriment. Given more pages, I think some of the stories I didn’t care for may have had a chance to get better.

I have a few minor complaints that I hope/wish will be addressed should these authors choose to release another anthology. The first is to have a better mix of historical and modern stories instead of only one historical. This didn’t take anything away from my enjoyment of the book but having more sub-genres represented is always good. I would also love to see stories that don’t feature only hetero couples and instead include some stories that show different sexual identities. These are very minor issues but things that would be great in the next anthology. On the flip side, I must give credit to this book for including not one but TWO stories featuring older protagonists. If you think finding Hanukkah romances is hard, try finding a romance with people older than 40! I also loved that a few of the stories had couples of different religions and different races. Some of the stories showed the challenges that people of two different faiths have when beginning to date or falling in love and I liked that this wasn’t glossed over. Romances that aren’t afraid to show some realities are always nice to read as long as you can still escape the real world for a time.

This was a fun and sweet anthology with a little bit of heat that is a welcome addition to the many holiday romances out there. There is a great mix of different tropes here including second chance romance, instalove, romantic suspense, and enemies to lovers so there really is something here for everyone. I hope these authors (or different ones!) decide to publish another anthology because we need more diverse romances.

Authors: Lori Ann Bailey, Mindy Klaksy, Rose Grey, Michelle Mars, JT Silver, Erin Eisenberg, Lavinia Klein, and Lynne Silver

Published: November 5, 2019

Rating: 4 Stars

State of Terror

I’m a huge Louise Penny fan (both of her writing and of her!) so when I heard she was not only writing a book outside of her Inspector Gamache series, but her co-author was Hillary Clinton, I was excited. I assumed I would like the book but how would her writing translate from a cozy style to a more thriller-esque mystery? While I had some minor issues, overall I enjoyed this book and I would read another one by her and Clinton if they decide to continue their collaboration.

As far as thrillers go, State of Terror succeeded in keeping me in suspense, anticipation, and excitement with a compelling story and interesting characters, despite the story being based on real events and characters clearly based on actual politicians. The story starts with several bombs being detonated in cities across the world, with the implication that these attacks are only the beginning of a wave of increasingly larger and more deadly attacks. Tasked to investigate and stop the terrorists is the new Secretary of State, Ellen Adams who has surprisingly accepted the position despite President Douglas Williams being her political rival. On the surface, this seems like a shrewd move by Williams and an attempt to heal the divide in their party, but Adams knows the truth-he wants her to fail so all the blame will fall on her when he can’t repair the damage the former President inflicted on the country and the world. Penny and Clinton don’t attempt to hide that the former President in this book is based on our actual former guy, just as Secretary Adams is based on Clinton herself. While I understand why they chose to do this, I sometimes found this distracting because I couldn’t stop thinking about the real people these characters were based on. (As it turns out, there were several more characters based on real people, as revealed in the acknowledgements at the end but they are minor so I didn’t notice). The original characters, and there were a lot, added to the story in ways that made sense and I was given time to get to know them so when they found themselves in dangerous situations, I found myself caring about what happened to them. There’s nothing worse in a thriller than not caring when you should because that takes you right out of the story. It could have been confusing with so many characters but the decision to change the points of view frequently helped me to not forget who each person was and kept me invested in each person’s storyline.

Where this book really excels is the story, which manages to avoid playing into stereotypes while being accurate to the real threats the world is facing right now. You can tell this was Clinton’s time to shine and her expertise shows. The threats in this book feel real and that must be thanks to Clinton’s knowledge in foreign affairs. My main issue with this book, and honestly with most thrillers, is that it was just too long. Pages could have been cut without sacrificing the story and it still would have been a hefty size.

This was a decent thriller written by a great writer and a woman with exceptional government knowledge. The story kept me engaged the whole time and I thought it wrapped up well. I think most people would find it an easy to read, enjoyable book and I recommend it.

Authors: Louise Penny and Hillary Rodham Clinton

Release Date: October 12, 2021

Rating: 4 Stars

All the Feels

One of the things I like most about Olivia Dade’s heroes, and especially the ones in her Spoiler Alert series, is how free they are expressing their emotions and how unafraid they are to enjoy the thing they love, even if those things would be deemed less than manly by most people in society. Alex, the hero in her latest book, All the Feels, is no different, and may be my favorite of hers so far. A lot of focus is spent on her heroines, and for good reason, but Alex captured my heart in a way a romance hero hasn’t in a long time. This book may not be for everyone but I enjoyed Dade’s latest look into the world of Hollywood, fanfiction, and all things nerdy.

Continue reading “All the Feels”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑